Introducing annegb
annegb

I’ve been blogging a couple of years now since I stumbled in here looking for visiting teaching ideas. I feel I’ve found a home and friends who uplift and stimulate, and sometimes, infuriate me.

I began blogging under the name annegb and it stuck, mostly because I love the name anne. It sounds so serene and dignified, unlike myself.

As blogging took on more of a life of its own in my life, I’ve posted about my real name a couple of times and it’s available at my personal blog, but nobody seemed to care and so neither did I. However, I take responsibility for my opinions expressed in my comments and my posts. Anyone who wants to hunt me down and shoot me for them can easily find me and might even find me grateful for putting me out of my misery :).

I’m an old broad, been married three times, this last for 25 years to a solid good man. I have seven kids, of the yours-mine-ours variety, and eight grandchildren. Being a grandma rocks!

I love to read and lay around and watch TV and eat junk food. I don’t have too many aspirations beyond getting the dishes done and serving dinner to my food-slut husband.

Life is mostly good, most of the time.

250 Posts
Keep ‘em guessin’ Apr. 25th, 2014 at 12:03 pm

I consider myself an active member of the church, but I wonder how others in my ward perceive me. Those who’ve known me for years know that I’m pretty orthodox, a bit flaky, but still…….

I’ve played with the new people, though. Our ward split—actually added area—while Bill and I were separated. I tell new people I’ve been in jail or rehab, that I’m inactive. I don’t—well, I can’t—hide my differences. Differences from the sincere and friendly people who’ve moved into our ward and want to be a part of us. Read more »

Paradigm…….shift Apr. 9th, 2014 at 11:49 am

I have a few words that I’ve learned in my reading travels that I like to toss out to confuse my less learned friends and to impress others with my great intelligence. Paradigm is one of them. I learned it from a professor. (Oxymoron, dichotomy, ambivalence…..all good words)

So, I’ve had a paradigm shift. In essence, I’ve changed my mind. It happened this week and is more of a spiritual awakening than being convinced intellectually of anything. Totally unsought and unexpected.

It started Saturday afternoon as I thought of those women lining up to attend priesthood. I felt a sudden pang of sisterhood and so much sympathy for them. I’d previously been pissed off at them because I thought this demonstration was crossing a line into open rebellion. I didn’t like that they were, in essence, airing our church’s dirty laundry publicly. Better to do as I do, simmer, and bitch and moan to local authorities ad nauseum. Read more »

Does it really matter? Mar. 15th, 2014 at 3:08 pm

Kirby is on my facebook page, either as a friend or sometimes if famous people have too many friends all you can do is like them. His latest column Why I Remain a Mormon, etc…… was, in my opinion, perfect. I echo his sentiments. I shared it and have noticed it popping up all over facebook, with some criticism of his blase attitude.

One woman said it sounded like he didn’t care if the church was true or not and that wasn’t a selling point to her. Thought about that. Thought “who cares?” Who’s trying to sell anything?

Then I realized, it doesn’t matter. It doesn’t matter if you don’t have a testimony sealed with super glue, but prefer our way of worship. It doesn’t matter if you just feel comfortable in the Mormon Church. Well, maybe to your bishop in a recommend interview (which I’m more and more thinking is just a silly process). Read more »

Turn the “but” around……. Feb. 25th, 2014 at 12:00 pm

I taught RS a couple of weeks ago for a friend who was out of town. I used this from Exponent http://www.the-exponent.com/relief-society-lesson-4-strengthening-and-preserving-the-family/comment-page-1/ and focused a lot on a couple of quotes from Marjorie Hinckley urging women to accept themselves and to use what works for their family and discard the rest.

I also used the quote from Orson Whitney which Elder Bednar refers to in the latest issue of the Ensign, regarding salvation for wayward children. A dear friend called me asking if I’d seen the article and I said I had, adding I felt prophetic. Then she said it. “But.” And she referred to the caveats Elder Bednar added. She’s a good and kind person who was geniunely delighted that there was something in the Ensign that I’d used. Still, I reacted badly. Read more »

“We Were Not Lucky Children” Feb. 4th, 2014 at 12:35 pm

Heather Young, aka our LIZ has written and self published her memoirs—–only took her 10+ years :). You can get it on Amazon or Barnes & Noble; it’s “Ezra And Hadassah: A Portrait of American Royalty.”

“We were not lucky children and I didn’t know why” she writes as she tells her story of being born to handicapped parents (her father was developmentally challenged with a low IQ and her mother was a paranoid schizophrenic who was convinced she’d been born on a planet called LaMordia). She, then called Hadassah, and her older brother, Ezra were named after biblical royalty because their mother wanted them to have names befitting their importance as half LaMordian and half earthling. Read more »

Drama in the Temple: Thumbs Down Jan. 27th, 2014 at 11:14 am

I’m probably a day late and a dollar short with this; oh, well. Bill and I haven’t been to the temple since the movie change, to our shame, so last week we drove to St. George, checked into our favorite little motel and headed out.

I love the cleanliness, light and peace of the temple. I feel weight leaving my shoulders as I enter and breathe easier. I was excited and alert as the movie began….then I began to figuratively shake my head in dismay. To quote some valley girl “I was, like, what??” I felt an urge to snicker at the over-acting and I hated the dark tone of the whole thing. The filming, I mean, it’s not beautiful and light in the places where I think it should be and I miss the live shots of the earth. Read more »

Book Review: The Burnout Cure, by Julie de Azevedo-Hanks Jan. 22nd, 2014 at 11:21 am

We’ve come a long way, baby, we Mormon women. I didn’t agree that wearing pants to church was a good way to make a point, but I do agree that progress needed to be made.

I see a lot of young women, though, who are putting the burden of perfection upon themselves to the breaking point. Sometimes they break with the church but more often they break with themselves. Read more »

My Dream Mission Program or….Now that women are giving the opening prayer in meetings, I’m on to other causes Dec. 17th, 2013 at 11:58 am

I think our mission program needs re-vamping (well, along with the visiting teaching and home teaching). Total overhaul.

Here are some of my suggestions:

1. Allow the missionary to specify the length of their service. Some are not up to two years, but might kick butt for six months. Read more »

DKL speaks from the past Dec. 17th, 2013 at 11:53 am

I was in the Costco in Lewiston, Idaho one time, and I saw a lady with a shirt that said, “Stupid raisins! Stay out of my cookies!” and I thought “How great is that?” because all this time I thought I was the only person in the world who hates raisins in cookies, and now I know I’m not alone. Thank you, lady from Lewiston Costco.

I have simple tastes. For years I ate mostly Big Macs. In college I ate mostly pizza — warm for dinner, cold for breakfast and lunch, because cold pizza is the breakfast of champions. Unfortunately, living with other people (like a spouse and kids) means never eating the same thing more than once a day. Shoot, sometimes I don’t even get to eat the same thing more than once a week. It has taken some time to get used to.

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Mormon Women Bare, a review Dec. 7th, 2013 at 11:24 am

Mormon women have bodies, too

Warning!! The above is a link to actual total nudity; perhaps you will not want to click on it.

Some years back, a group of older British women posed nude in pearls for a calendar to raise money for a charity. I absolutely loved the pictures. Each woman looked lovely; the main focus of the picture was showing their beauty not their nakedness. Our bodies change for the worse as we age and I was heartened.

English Ladies

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Split Personality: Part Nazi, Part Socialist Dec. 5th, 2013 at 11:58 am

When we were kids, “the social worker” was a powerful person in our lives. They came to check out our house and, I guess, decide about benefits my mom would receive. We worried about being “taken away” because as bad as it was at home, it was familiar and we were together. I don’t know how much money the welfare gave my mother; I know it wasn’t a lot. She didn’t always pay the rent and we were often hungry. Periodically, we’d get boxes of “commodities” that contained food items that a more accomplished cook could have made into good meals, but my mother was a terrible cook. We ate some of it—the cheese and the blocks of processed meat—-without any preparation. We just cut pieces off and ate them. I imagine some of the food was thrown away, wasted. It seemed like Mom always had money for cigarettes, though. And she got drunk. Maybe she bummed them or other people bought her booze, but I’m convinced she could have cared for us much better than she did. Read more »

Stuff like this makes Facebook worth it…… Nov. 27th, 2013 at 10:18 am

This is Water

I hope I did that right :). I absolutely love this reminder of life’s real meaning. I tend to be obnoxiously engaging at places like checkout lines (if you talk loudly on your cell phone, I figure I’m invited into the conversation and I WILL share my opinion about what you should take to the party) and I often wish I were a quiet person who other people couldn’t figure out. BUT I also often see many people who don’t see anyone else around them. And that’s sad.

The Walking Dead and what I think they should do differently Nov. 10th, 2013 at 12:08 pm

netflix poster for mm

I’ve watched some of The Walking Dead from time to time and been really grossed out. My word, do they have to show the beasts gobbling down the intestines? Yuk. But the acting is good and the characters compelling so now that I’ve discovered Netflix streaming, I decided I’d start from the beginning. Got hooked, of course. Like the guy above. Geez, it’s like a mental illness.
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Suffer the Little Children……… Oct. 26th, 2013 at 10:37 pm

Bookslinger sent me the link to this story today: Lawsuit against LDS Church (If this doesn’t work try a copy & paste for this http://www.journal-news.net/page/content.detail/id/600380/Lawsuit-filed-against-church-for-coverup-of-sex-abuse.html)

I hadn’t heard of this story before, but if it’s true, it makes me just so incredibly sad. Some of it doesn’t quite make sense to me and maybe it’s because the family of the abuser was so totally whacked it couldn’t make sense, but I wonder if the reporter got all the facts right.

For instance, he writes:

“After learning of the abuse, Jensen’s parents allegedly banished him from the family home and made him sleep in the backyard but, at the time, allegedly encouraged church families to use their son as a babysitter,”

What? Read more »

Dissing Jesus: The Great Mormon Divide Sep. 13th, 2013 at 11:47 am

Satan works through me at church when I hear people talk about all the “shoulds” and quote “faith without works is dead.” (Which I always wonder if it’s grammatically correct). Because I forget what I’m supposed to be about and then contention enters and it gets all ugly.

There’s been a flap about a childrens book by Wendy Watson Nelson, the wife of Elder Nelson (who, I think, is one of the sweetest apostles we’ve ever had). You can read about it here: http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/blogsfaithblog/56851977-180/book-lds-christ-club.html.csp

I loved this quote from Peggy Fletcher Stack’s column: “If only we can prevent people from performing wrong actions, we think, they can return safely to heaven, untouched by the world and I would add, untouched by Christ’s grace.” (Edward Jones, A Rational Faith) Read more »

Goldfield Days….. Sep. 9th, 2013 at 1:06 pm

I lived in Goldfield, Nevada for about a year when I was a little girl. It’s hazy because we moved back and forth so much. Nevada has some interesting old towns that were once boom towns and Goldfield is one of the most interesting.

When I lived there, there wasn’t much left of the town, the population is quite small. In its boom period, they’d built a big high school and gym, which we were threatened with our lives not to play in. We did anyway. We found a place that was broken to sneak into the gym and we had a good time. Someone had hung a thick rope with a knot in it to the ceiling and we’d work together to pull it to the side (no memory how we did that) and then we’d sit on the knot and swing. It was pretty fun. Read more »

R Rated? Why I’m Going Back to “The MIddle.” Aug. 25th, 2013 at 11:59 am

The middle 3Well, for me, it started with “Boss.” Or maybe it was “Homeland.” I can’t remember. One of those. Anyway, I got hooked on both shows.

Boss stars Kelsey Grammar and is about a political “boss” with no morals. The acting is superb, the actors and characters are compelling and the plots interesting. I blew off the sex scenes because pornography doesn’t interest me in the least and they couldn’t corrupt me that way and I fast forwarded through the violence. Read more »

Will you guys help me identify these guys? Aug. 10th, 2013 at 11:33 am

British actors in a bar NYC

First of all, kids, I am the most un-photogenic person on earth, so pay no attention to the lady in the picture.

When Sarah and I went to New York in 2005, she became very ill. We cut our trip drastically because we spent the better part of two days in Bellevue’s ER. I pushed her in a wheelchair to visit the Natural History Museum and we really had to pace ourselves. We couldn’t get a flight home until the day before we’d planned to go anyway and it was double the cost, so we mostly hung out at our hotel.

I fell in love with New York, loved the blunt goodness of the people. But it was pretty stressful. One evening, Sarah had gone to sleep and I asked the doorman where I could find shepherd’s pie. I needed comfort food. He directed me to the pub next door and I sat down near the fireplace and ordered good old shepherd’s pie. Read more »

Heavenly Mother the Focus of New Art and Poetry Contest Aug. 5th, 2013 at 11:29 am

AMHbanner300

There have been LDS art contests in the past, either sponsored by LDS church institutions or by private organizations, but none have yet focused on Heavenly Mother as their theme. That changed this month with the newly announced A Mother Here Art and Poetry Contest. Aiming to stimulate the visual and poetic expression of Heavenly Mother, as well as highlight the nascent divinity lying in women as well as men, monetary prizes in excess of $2200 will be awarded to the best entries.

The contest accepts two-dimensional art submissions to be considered in its visual arts awards, and all forms of poetry for the poetry awards. The contest will accept submissions until March 4, 2014, after which award-winning entries will be chosen by prestigious judges Susan Elizabeth Howe (esteemed poet, playwright, and professor) and Herman Du Toit (former head of the Durban Art School and former head of museum research at BYU’s Museum of Art). Winning entries will be announced on May 11, 2014 (Mother’s Day) and they, with other merit-worthy entries, will be collected in an online gallery and a printed booklet for all to enjoy. Attached is the official call for artists and poets. Read more »

Letters from my mother……. Jul. 25th, 2013 at 11:32 am

The last thing my mother said to me was “I love you.” We were driving home from the hospital where they’d told me there was nothing they could do for the broken bones in her back. I ache with regret for not making them send her in an ambulance. They’d drugged her to the gills for the ride back to the rest home where she lived (she thought, in her own apartment, where she could go on daily walks to see the other tenants) but she was in such pain. I am the WORST person to be around when you’re suffering, I just empathize to a ridiculous level that I’m worthless to help. I kept saying “I’m so sorry, Mommy, I’m hurrying. We’re almost there.”

I didn’t think she even knew who I was, but she touched my leg and said clearly, “I love you.” And I nodded and she said, again “No. I mean it. I love you.” She died five days later, mostly comatose during that time. Read more »

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