Introducing Proud Daughter of Eve
Proud Daughter of Eve

English degree holder and gleeful grammar-nazi. Lover of manga, sci-fi and fantasy. Sixth generation member of the LDS church struggling with an inclination to be a bit too opinionated.

38 Posts
Mormons in Space Feb. 18th, 2014 at 2:40 pm

This came up, in a round-about way, on a sci-fi discussion list I’m on.

Now, I’ve always assumed/dreamed/hoped that (assuming the Second Coming doesn’t come first) some day we’ll start colonizing other planets.  As part of that, I’ve always had a little dream of a Mormon Planet – called either Zion or Deseret, I’m sure.

BUT.

What would happen if our intrepid pioneers made planetfall and then lost contact?  Truly, completely cut off – the wormhole that leads to their system has collapsed, for example.  (Assuming that immediate survival is not at issue, because that’s clearly a different discussion.)

My prediction is that they’d immediately print out copies of the scriptures, plans for the printing press, recipes for paper and ink.  They’d probably have already organized into a branch at least so they’d keep with that organization until it was clear (or God prompted someone) that contact was not going to be re-established.  At that point, a new Prophet and Apostles would be called.

Because hey, starting from scratch in the wilderness with help inaccessible is not new to us.

How do you think they’d handle it?

Too good for the sideblog. Mar. 2nd, 2009 at 2:07 pm

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20090301.wstemcells0301/BNStory/Science/

All I can really say to that is “Hallelujah!”

Though I can also say “Would they have found this solution if no one had objected to the use of embryonic stem sells to start with?”

Now, no more babies will be created for the sole purpose of destruction.  Now, people will have access to their own stem sells, making rejection a non-issue.

God bless those scientists.

The White Home Jan. 20th, 2009 at 9:58 pm

The crowds have dispersed. The lights, the cameras, and the excitement are all gone from the Capitol Building. They have moved on to the 14 inaugural balls scattered throughout D.C. and to the many, many private celebrations in the city and around the world.

Champagne is being drunk and toasts are being made. Music is playing and people are dancing. The air is electrified with change. Of all the changes, anticipated or otherwise, being spoken of in the world tonight, there is one that may be a little over-looked.

Among all the sleepless throng are two small people caught up in events bigger than themselves: events bigger than most 9- and 7-year olds ever have to face. After all, it’s not every grade-schooler whose father becomes the most powerful man in the world. Nor does every grade-schooler attend classes and birthday parties with body-guards. Yet at the end of the day, the things they will face aren’t so different after all. Their daddy has a new job that will most likely put a lot of stress on him. They probably won’t get to see him as much as they used to. They’ve had to leave their old house with it’s known and loved quirks and must learn all over again which stair squeaks, where the best hiding places are and how to sneak a snack. Though it is they who moved and not their friends, still their friends are gone and soon they must face the gauntlet of classmates and teachers without them.

So, tonight I have something to add to the toasts and speeches.

Welcome home, Malia and Sasha. I hope you like it here.

Where “Rough Stone Rolling” bowled me over. Jun. 26th, 2008 at 8:01 pm

At 5:16 p.m. on June 27th I want you to stop and take a look around. What do you see? What do you hear?

Contrast that with Joseph Smith’s last minutes.

Read more »

Our culture is crazy. You know that, right? Jun. 21st, 2008 at 1:54 pm

I think I’ve finally found the female answer to pr0n. No, it’s not “Playgirl.”

I bet you can’t guess.

Go on. Think.

Read more »

What do the Lord’s tools feel about their roles? Apr. 17th, 2008 at 10:03 pm

Most of you have heard by now about the raid on the Yearning for Zion Ranch. There’s some excellent coverage at Messenger and Advocate.

I’ve been watching this anxiously for many days. As a 5th-generation Mormon, descended myself from polygamous families, and as the person I am (personal history, opinions, experiences and such), this hits a very sore spot.

Yesterday, I’d had enough. I was going to start a letter campaign. I was going to tell the Governor of Texas, my Congressman, the ACLU and anyone else I could think of exactly what I thought of the situation and I was going to encourage anyone who would listen to do the same. I was sure I was in the right. As I said my prayers last night, I asked for guidance, for help saying the right words. Read more »

Diamonds in the Muck Apr. 14th, 2008 at 10:25 pm

…Or, Finding the Gospel in strange places.

I just finished watching “Hellboy.”  Though I’d been hesitant about it at first, by the end I all but standing up and cheering.

“You have a choice!  Your father gave it to you!”   (Or, as I experienced that line, “You have a choice!  Your Father gave it to you!”)

What makes a man a man? A friend of mine once wondered. Is it his origins? The way he comes to life? I don’t think so.  It’s the choices he makes. Not how he starts things, but how he decides to end them” (emphasis added).

Not that I thought “Hellboy” was muck.  It’s just not the place I was expecting to encounter these pearls from the Gospel.

So, what gems have you found in what unexpected places?

Brainwaves Mar. 31st, 2008 at 12:08 pm

Last week, with electrode-studded headbands strapped to their scalps, three percussionists banged out a cacophony of sound and rythm at a performance/neuroscience experiment titled “trio for percussion and brain waves.” As a rapt audience watched, sounds issued fro three laptops connected to the drummers by Bluetooth technology. The musicians’ brainwaves travelled through the air, triggering tones from the computers before leaping to life on the 12-foot-high screen hanging behind them. The performance was part of an experiment designed by David Sulzer, a neuroscientist at New York’s Columbia University. It demonstrated his idea that thinking about an action could stimulate the brain in much the same way as carrying it out.” Source: TheScientist.com

David Sulzer’s idea?   I think it’s a bit older than that.

“He that looketh on a woman to lust after her, hath committed adultery already in his heart. “  (Matt. 5:28, 3 Nephi 12:18, D&C 63:16.)

Teach me to… teach. Mar. 10th, 2008 at 12:31 pm

I’ve been asked to teach the Relief Society lesson (#6 from the Joseph Smith manual) next week.

I tried to be good and get it all worked out this week.  I sat down and read it.  I read the introduction and what it had to say on lessons.  But I have absolutely no clue where to start.  What makes a lesson interesting?  What makes it spiritual?  As the question that led to Joseph and Oliver’s experience with John the Baptist was sparked during a translation session, is it worth it to mention the Urimm and Thummim and how the translating worked?  Or is that just my desire to show off some of the stuff I’ve learned as I’ve studied church history?

What’s a good formula for leading a discussion?  I am totally at sea here.  Frustrating as it could be sometimes, I am REALLY missing the primary manual right now.

Baby Hungry. Feb. 24th, 2008 at 6:01 pm

They say it the same way they used to say “boy crazy.” There’s amusement, tolerance and ultimately dismissal. From some, there’s the assumption that those who are “baby hungry” are victims of either hormones or patriarchal brain-washing.

How much they misunderstand. Read more »

When a choice is placed before you… Dec. 16th, 2007 at 12:52 pm

Lately I’ve been working for a company that certifies those who serve, sell or handle alcohol.  The program is designed to help bar tenders, wait staff, and etc. to help others enjoy their alcohol responsibly by making them aware of legalities as well as some biology.  (E.g., one of the questions on the test postulates persons A, B, C and D all having the same amount to drink but having different weights and fitness levels.  The test-taker must indicate which of the four will have the highest BAC.)

The other day I took a call from someone who had done the program online.  She had failed.  She’d called to find out how much she’d failed by and to ask if this meant she had to purchase the program again.  She did.  We’re not monsters; everyone is entitled to one re-take test but she’d failed both.  She said she couldn’t afford to buy another one (the price is about $40 CDN).  She needed to be certified for her job.  This is a legitimate need — Ontario law stipulates that everyone who serves, sells or handles alcohol has to have this certification. Read more »

You can please some of the people some of the time… Oct. 8th, 2007 at 9:53 pm

… and then there’s the Bloggernacle.

Every conference session that has come along since I joined the bloggernacle, I’ve seen people complain about the Relief Society speakers. Their talks are too soft and mushy. “Give us some meat!” people say. “Be more like the Priesthood session. Don’t be so cheerfully girly.”

It appears that Sister Beck has done just that. No cheerleading, no careful emotional grooming. Simple, straight-forward “This is what we should be doing.”

The response? Moaning, mocking and (apparent) rules lawyering.

It’s times like this that remind me that, however much my Primary class drives me up the wall, however burned out I feel and however much (and that’s very much) I’d like to just quit … I doubt it can hold a candle to how fed-up God must be with the rest of us.

He keeps going though. I suppose I can too.

(Note: This post isn’t a judgment on anyone. I’m just amused by the irony.)

Enough with “Reasonable Accommodation.” Sep. 23rd, 2007 at 10:01 pm

Memo to the Quebeckers: the war is over. France lost. You are English territory now. In fact, you’ve been English territory for 244 years.

When I moved to Canada three years ago, I thought the Québec vs. the Rest of the Country thing was cute. It reminded me of the various regional rivalries we have in the States. It didn’t seem like anything that couldn’t be overcome or that would prevent respectful relations. Read more »

Losing Salt Lake Sep. 4th, 2007 at 12:26 pm

Recently MormonMentality interviewed one of the candidates in Jerusalem’s upcoming mayoral elections. Of all the many issues to be addressed — such as homelessness, affordable housing, sustainable development — the topic close to the candidate’s heart soon became clear. Read more »

Best. Birthday. Present. Ever. Jul. 29th, 2007 at 8:55 pm

I did it.

It was and it wasn’t what I was expecting.

Yet even as I continue sorting out my feelings about it, I find myself breaking into an ear-to-ear grin.

Perhaps I’d better back up a bit. Read more »

An ode to Girls’ Camp Jul. 1st, 2007 at 11:14 am

My Girls’ Camp, ’tis of thee

Sweet tents of liberty, of thee I sing;

All the marshmallows we roasted,

Of hikes past we boasted,

From all girls bonfire toasted, let testimonies ring! Read more »

The Church of Feminism. Jun. 28th, 2007 at 12:30 pm

It seems to be all around us. On a thread over at FMH, commenter Quimby mentions her desire as a young woman to be told “It’s okay to want it all. You are not less of a feminist for wanting to get married and have children.”

On the popular TV sitcom “How I Met Your Mother,” the character Victoria agonizes over whether or not to accept a two-year fellowship in Germany. She’s two months into a relationship with a man she thinks may be The One but worries it would be “unfeminist” to pass up this career opportunity for a guy.

Feminism has done great things for women; I won’t deny it. However, this creeping thread has wound its way into the collective unconscious: is my choice a “feminist choice?” Can I call myself a good feminist if I do “X” or “Y?”

Um, I’m kind of confused here. I thought the point of feminism was a woman’s right to make her own decisions in life, whatever they may be. When did it become the standard by which a woman has to make her choices?

Gazing into the crystal Bloggernacle. Jun. 18th, 2007 at 3:22 pm

“How Catholic of you.” Read more »

Oh, but it is! Jun. 13th, 2007 at 7:25 pm

Comic books and the Gospel. Interesting mix, eh?

I just couldn’t let this go unanswered. “True redemption demands that you seek forgiveness for your past misdeeds. That you atone for the actions that caused the Twelve Gods to turn away from you.” This much is good. However, “Redemption is a rare and special thing, after all. It is not for everyone,” is not good.

Redemption may be a rare and special thing but it is for everyone! It is for them in the sense that it can suit everyone; it is for them in the sense that even the possibility of redemption is a precious gift, given to all by a Father and Brother who love each and every one of us. Our quirks don’t matter. Our failures don’t matter. We are loved! Not everyone chooses to earn redemption in this life but I assure you, it is for every single one of us.

To the Pastor II: May. 25th, 2007 at 1:34 pm

Margaret Young at By Common Consent has written to you before about life in the LDS church. In moving terms and with beautiful metaphor she described her experience with the gospel as a born and bred member of an active family. The picture I have to share with you is different but is an equally important part of what it means to be Mormon. Read more »

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